Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers

What Makes Us Human?

Adrianne Finlay tackles a big concept with Your One and Only in only 320 pages. There is a vast amount that happens in this story, and there is even more that could happen.

As humanity is slowly killed by a plague, a group of scientists build a quarantined community in Costa Rica and tirelessly work on creating clones. As the original scientists die and the clone population grows, their views of humanity grow more perverse with each new generation. The originals intended for these clones to reproduce in a natural, sexual way, but the clones have their own ideas for such matters.

After 300 years of cloning the same DNA the structure is breaking down and becoming unstable. Using the archive of additional human DNA curated by the Originals, the clones create a human. Jack is treated with disgust and disdain for being different and not a perfect copy of one of the originals. He is left mostly isolated and introduced to the group of clones his own age when they are in their mid-teens. Naturally it doesn’t go well. One clone, Althea-310 sympathizes with Jack as she has a scar on her wrist, setting her apart from her flawless Althea sisters. And this sympathy is the beginning of the end.

Finlay dedicates much of the beginning of the novel to world building, thus giving it a slow start. She alternates POVs from Althea-310 and Jack and it helps greatly to round out not only the characters but the stores overall. The clones have bizarre customs, but we’re given a chance to understand them with Althea’s POV. Jack’s rage and violence wouldn’t have felt as sincere if we didn’t see his POV, either.

For as slow as the beginning is, the ending zips by. The action escalates as the story goes on, but I grew concerned as the number of pages dwindled and the plot seemed to lengthen. The ending is left opened but satisfying enough that I’m not expecting a sequel, but Finlay covers a lot of ground in a dozen pages. This leaves the whole story feeling off kilter. Finlay built an interesting world, giving us a unique clone story. Even with the unbalanced narration, it was still a fun read. It probably won’t make my top 10 for 2018 (there is a lot of year left) but I certainly don’t regret reading it.



By: Emily Coleman


What Will Disappear Next?

I haven’t been reading YA as frequently as I used to. The characters tend to get on my nerves and the sentences are more likely to bother me. While The Disappearances is far from perfect, it has a unique and refreshing premise. Murphy created a story steeped in mystery laced with literary references. The amount of research and prep that went into this stories structure is impressive. And as Murphy’s debut novel, she will only strengthen her style and voice.

Aila and her brother Miles are shipped off to live with her deceased mother’s childhood friend after their father is drafted into WWl. The siblings are treated with distrust and disdain because their mother left Sterling and never came back. Aila learns their mother was blamed for a curse blanketing the town and the surrounding towns for decades. The disappearances occur every seven years. Smell disappeared first. The stars. Colors from paint and pencils. A person’s reflection. Children born into these towns grow up without these senses. When Aila and Miles arrive, they lose all of them as well.

Each disappearance could be linked back to Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets. Murphy must have read Shakespeare backward and forward to pull out just the right lines to create a story around them. Using everything she’s learned from her mother’s personal copy of Shakespeare’s collected works, Aila helps the town inventor and her new group of friends to lift the curse that has plagued the town for so long.

The Disappearances is a story that suffers from “weak ending” syndrome. The ending seemed too easy. There were questions left unanswered. Not that the story rose those questions, but I wanted to know more about why that worked or how that didn’t work. It wasn’t explored enough for me to feel completely satisfied. My final feeling is that it was good; worthwhile premise but lackluster ending.




By Emily Coleman